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'Logan' film review

'Logan' film review

'Logan' is the latest film to be produced by the 20th Century Fox owned section of Marvel Comics. 'Logan' is about the character Wolverine of the 'X-Men' franchise, however this film is far from being a typical 'X-Men' film. Given the R rating (15 here in the UK) that Wolverine's character has long deserved, 'Logan' has a level of darkness and grit that no other 'X-Men' film has achieved yet. Whilst last year's hugely successful 'Deadpool' was also given an R rating, its hilarity and charm kept it from becoming too gloomy. 'Logan', on the other hand, has no such qualms in wrenching the heartstrings.

It is set in an almost post-apocalyptic near future, where no new mutants have been born in over 25 years. An accident has killed many of the X-Men, whilst other mutants have been hunted to near extinction. Hugh Jackman's Logan is no longer the Wolverine, more a shell of his former self. He is bitter, done with the world and working as a limousine driver on the USA/Mexico border. He has to look after a now nearly senile Professor Charles Xavier, played brilliantly by Patrick Stewart, whose loss over control over his powerful mind due to a neurodegenerative disease causes him seizures that can harm those around him. Jackman and Stewart do so well in this film. It's genuinely heartbreaking to see what both men have become: depressed, borderline suicidal and shadows of who they used to be.

Their situation is interrupted drastically by the arrival of eleven year old mutant girl named Laura, who has the same gifts as Logan. Dafne Keen absolutely steals the show in most of her scenes. She also has such a brilliant glare and scowl that managed to make me, a twenty year old, want to run to the hills away from someone half my age. I'm excited to see more of her in the future. 

An exhausted and bitter Logan (Hugh Jackman) takes a power nap as Laura (Dafne Keen) watches over him.

An exhausted and bitter Logan (Hugh Jackman) takes a power nap as Laura (Dafne Keen) watches over him.

One thing I can definitely say about this film is it earns its rating right from the very beginning. Along with multiple swears, 'Logan' shows in much more graphic detail the true effects of Wolverine's claws i.e. decapitation and copious amounts of blood, but somehow not beyond what feels realistic. It almost doesn't feel like a superhero film. It's brutal. Yet it is also overwhelmingly sad in parts. Jackman has been such an excellent Wolverine over the years and I am sad that this is his last film in the role, but this is by far his best performance.

I'm not entirely sure how to feel about this film. It has some rather large plot holes which have been bothering me since I watched it (mostly questions about how Logan got in various situations as well as how his mutant ability is degenerating). However, it is an exceedingly rich character study. It's warm and heartfelt at crucial moments, the action is excellent - if slightly savage - but at the same time it's really heartbreaking. It's a really sombre film. It is an excellent film, but it's harrowing, particularly to someone who has enjoyed watching Hugh Jackman shine as the Wolverine for a good chunk of my childhood. I'd recommend bringing tissues with you to the cinema, but it is an excellent send off to the character and Hugh Jackman's 17-year journey as the Wolverine ends in a smash.

Rating: 4/5

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