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'Get Out' film review

I'm going to admit something here. Before this, I had never seen any film that even remotely resembled a horror film as a cinematic experience. Horror films are something I normally avoid seeing at the cinema as jump scares can seriously freak me out. Even when I watched 'Alien' for the first time I had my phone with the jump scares detailed out to me on a webpage so I wouldn't jump a foot every time. I had no such warning this time, and it was more exciting than I thought it would be. Anyway, I had heard great things about this film. It's not every day a film receives a 99% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, especially not a horror film. 'Get Out' is directed and written by Jordan Peele, who has previously exclusively produced only comedy works. 

'Get Out' centres on Chris Washington, a young black man who is working as a photographer. His white girlfriend, Rose Armitage, wishes for him to meet her parents, and thus, despite being slightly uncomfortable at the prospect of meeting them, he attends a stay at their house. However, all is not as it seems. Rose's family employ black servants who act strangely and Chris struggles to figure out what is just seemingly misdirected stereotyping versus what is genuinely disturbing. A lot of the tension in this film is down to showing Chris' questions about whether he is being paranoid or whether there is something creepy about Rose's family. The character of Chris' friend Rod is brilliant in this sense, as his conversations with Chris speculating that Chris would be detained in the suburbs - "white people love making people sex slaves and sh*t" - add a strange mix of horror and humour to the film.

Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) begins to question the behaviour of those around him at Rose's family party.

Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) begins to question the behaviour of those around him at Rose's family party.

It's an incredibly thought provoking film on many fronts and it deals head on the issues of racism in America. It's also one of those films that is best going into as blind as possible. The less you know about what to expect with this film, the better. But I can say that this film is savage. Jordan Peele has savagely ripped apart and highlighted the racial divisions in America in a way that I have never seen before. No holds are barred in this film and it adds to how brilliant this film is. It's smart, and is definitely a horror story for a modern age, where the monsters could be our neighbours, our friends, and worst of all, people who think they are acting for the greater good. The film deals with many fears of the black community, including issues with the police - who are seen as a hindrance to justice for the black characters rather than the usual horror story saviours - and it's so critical that it works impeccably.

The acting in this film is excellent, which is not always something that happens in a horror film. Daniel Kaluuya is absolutely brilliant as Chris, and the direction of Jordan Peele absolutely has to be praised. This film will shock you, horrify you and most of all, it will make you grimace, and that will not be due to the gore, but due to white middle class suburban people. 'Get Out' asks difficult questions, provoking your thoughts and crucially, it's startlingly clever and mesmerising in parts. One could even say hypnotic. Either way, I shall never look at a tea cup the same way ever again.

Rating: 4/5

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