Are you a film buff? If not, why are you here? Is it because I sent you the link to this website in the hope that I might inspire you to see some more of the films on offer in the cinema? It probably is that, isn't it?

'Wonder Woman' film review

'Wonder Woman' film review

It's here, ladies and gents. 'Wonder Woman' has arrived. 

'Wonder Woman' is directed by Patty Jenkins and is the newest film in DC Comics' Extended Universe. I personally feel the need to thank Patty Jenkins for giving that franchise her time because 'Wonder Woman' is the shake-up that DC needed. The first female-led superhero film since 2005's disastrous 'Elektra', a Marvel attempt, 'Wonder Woman' follows Diana, Princess of the Amazons, a tribe of fierce warrior women tasked with protecting the world. Diana enters the world after learning about World War One from Steve Trevor, a British spy pilot who crash lands by her home, the protected island of Themyscira.

Diana, aka. Wonder Woman, is played by Gal Gadot, reprising her role from 2016's 'Batman vs Superman', and she absolutely kills it. Her portrayal of Diana is fantastic and it is certainly one of my favourite superhero performances to date. What I love about Gadot, and indeed this film, is how well they have done the character. She captures the grace and beauty of Diana, but also her naivety, her kindness and her ferociousness. When she arrives in World War One era London, she's very much in unfamiliar territory, and instead of immediately adapting to it, she struggles as everyone would. Her confusion at why women wear dresses (impractical for fighting) and why no-one listens to the people supporting the Armistice ("but they talk of peace, how can they not listen?")  is spot-on and it highlights well Diana's completely different perspective to those shared by those around her.

Diana mistakes 1910s fashion for armour, much to the bemusement of Etta (Lucy Davis).

Diana mistakes 1910s fashion for armour, much to the bemusement of Etta (Lucy Davis).

Diana's innocence about many aspects of the world makes for some great timed humour throughout the film and it makes her a fun and interesting character. It's hilarious watching some of the exchanges between her and Chris Pine's Steve Trevor. Chris Pine is brilliant; he was likeable and does well as the more cynical focal view of the audience, a contrast to Diana's initial optimism. The story for this film is engaging with plot twists that I didn't predict. But what really makes this film stunning is the action sequences. They're so well choreographed and slow-motion is used frequently (but effectively) to show the complexities of them. The scene where Wonder Woman reveals her armour for the first time in the film and enter's No Man's Land on the Belgian front just had my heart racing.

It's so marvellous to see a superhero film absolutely own every aspect of itself. Despite multiple villains occasionally throwing plot points on several occasions, 'Wonder Woman' is overall an absolutely terrific film. It's full of action, humour and stellar characterisation, with a badass score to top it all off. 'Wonder Woman' has proved that a female-led (and female-directed!) superhero film can work and with a character leading it that is both feminine and ferocious. Director Patty Jenkins said that she "wanted to tell a story about a hero who believes in love, who is filled with love, who believes in change and the betterment of mankind...sincere and truthful and emotional." She did. This film is a triumph, and I urge you to see it immediately.

Rating: 4.5/5

'Baby Driver' film review

'Baby Driver' film review

'Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales' film review

'Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales' film review